IEC Family

An expert in smart manufacturing

By Catherine Bischofberger

September 2018

Udo Bausch

The new Chair of Systems Committee (SyC) Smart manufacturing, Dr Udo Bausch, has always been involved in standardization activities, with a special emphasis on smart manufacturing.

He started his career as an electrical engineer at the Bosch group in 1985, inside the company’s telecoms business area. Right from the start, Bausch participated in different standardization activities at a national level inside the German Institute for Standardization (DIN) and the Association for Electrical, Electronic & Information Technologies (VDE). In 1996 he became head of the department of corporate strategy for intercompany standardization (DIN, DKE, ISO and IEC). In 2006, he joined Bosch Rexroth, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the German company, specializing in connected hydraulics. His role to this day is to head the company’s strategy related to international standardization, piloting the company’s Standards work in smart manufacturing. He actively participates in IEC Technical Committee (TC) 65: Industrial-process measurement, control and automation. He is a member of the ad-hoc group (ahG) on smart manufacturing information models inside Subcommittee (SC) 65E: Devices and integration in enterprise systems. He also participates in ISO/IEC Joint Working Group (JWG) 21 on smart reference models linked to ISO/TC 184: Automation systems and integration.

IEC Young Professionals in Busan for YP workshop

By Natalie Mouyal
June 2018

Young Professionals speak at various events

This year, around 70 Young Professionals (YP) are in Busan to attend the three-day YP Workshop held alongside the IEC General Meeting. For the YPs, this Workshop serves as an opportunity to learn more about the IEC work in standardization and conformity assessment as well as to network with the 3 000 IEC experts attending the General Meeting.

As part of the Workshop, YPs attend the Standardization Management Board (SMB) or Conformity Assessment Board (CAB) meeting, observe a technical meeting and participate in several breakout sessions. They also have the opportunity to meet with IEC Officers as well as the representatives from their National Committees, notably during a breakfast meeting.

YP Leaders from previous years are available to share their experiences and lead some sessions. Jonathan Colby, a YP leader from 2011, will give tips on how YPs can become involved in the work of standardization and conformity assessment at the national and international levels. Jonathan is currently Chair of Technical Committee (TC) 114 on marine energy as well as Chair of the Operational Management Committee (OMC) on marine energy for the IECRE. Alan Sellers, IEC 2016 YP Leader, will lead a session on the work of Strategic Group (SG) 12 – Digital transformation. The 2017 YP Leaders will also give presentations and lead the voting process for the new YP Leaders.

This year, YPs can participate in a half-day industry visit to LG Electronics Changwon factory which has been organized by the Korean Host Committee. This factory is attracting worldwide attention for its ability to produce one washing machine every 8.5 seconds.

Recent YP activities

This year, the YP Programme has put in place a number of activities to help ensure the continued involvement of YPs beyond the YP workshop.

Initiatives by 2017 YP Leaders

Each year, YP Leaders select activities to undertake on behalf of the YP programme. In 2018, YP Leaders have been giving presentations at local universities, preparing an FAQ and developing a standardization boot camp.

Jorge Richard Angulo from Mexico is working together with a small group of YPs to present an overview about the work of the IEC and their respective National Committees to local universities. This initiative has resulted in 10 presentations delivered at local universities.

Juan (Apple) Li from China has prepared a frequently asked questions (FAQ) to help future YPs navigate through the selection process and workshop. It provides detailed information from the perspective of a YP to help others better understand such topics as the relationship between YPs and IEC technical committees, the role of YP Leaders and how to prepare for the YP workshop. It is available on the YP section of the IEC website.

Annette Frederiksen from Germany has developed a one-day standardization boot camp which will take place in Frankfurt from 15-16 November. With the support of the IEC National Committee of Germany and Jan Tiedemann, IEC Community Manager, Annette has prepared the content for a workshop that simulates the full process of developing an IEC Standard. A test platform has been put in place on the new IEC Collaboration Tools so that participants can prepare their standard using IEC IT tools. The planning and tools developed for this one-day boot camp will be made available for use by other IEC National Committees.

Future Leaders Forum

In March, YPs participated in a Future Leaders Forum which explored the issue of cyber security in smart grids. Hosted by Siemens at its offices in Munich, the Forum brought together 10 YPs to discuss technology trends, standardization needs and conformity assessment for smart grids. The research institute VDI-VDE-IT which moderated the Forum discussions, produced a meeting report with an overview of the main issues addressed.

YPs expressed their satisfaction with the Forum with 85% indicating a willingness to participate in another Forum. Specifically, they enjoyed the networking opportunity and the lively discussions. Based on the feedback received from the participants, the IEC YP Programme is currently brainstorming ideas for possible editions in the future.

YP representatives in IEC groups

The IEC YP Programme serves as a gateway for further involvement in standardization and conformity assessment work at the IEC and national levels. YPs have served as experts on the IEC TCs, chaired TCs, and received the IEC 1906 award. Over 100 YPs have active roles in the IEC including at the national level.

Since 2017, YP representatives have participated in such SMB work as the Directives Maintenance Team (DMT), the Systems Resource Group (SRG) which reviews Systems activities. In 2018, YPs have joined Adhoc Group 79 which looks at the ethics of autonomous systems and SG 12 on the digital transformation. YPs have also been active in conformity assessment work with representatives participating in CAB working groups on systems issues and cyber security.

This bodes well for the future of standardization and conformity assessment as the next generation of experts is ready to continue the work accomplished by past and current IEC experts.

 


 

Obituary – Ronald C. Petersen

By Claire Marchand
June 2018

It is with great sadness that the IEC learned of the passing of Ron Petersen, former Chair of IEC TC 106 and a valuable member of the IEC community, at the age of 81.

Ron Petersen received his Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering (BSEE) and Master of Science in Electrophysics (MSEP) degrees from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. He joined the Bell Labs Solid-State Device Development Laboratory in 1960 where he was involved with the development of low-noise travelling-wave maser amplifiers, broadband solid state amplifiers, and silicon diode array camera tubes. In 1970, he joined the Bell Labs* Environmental Health and Safety Center and, until his retirement in 2001, managed the Bell Labs Wireless and Optical Technologies Safety Department (WOTS), which served as the AT&T* and Lucent Technologies Inc.* resource for all non-ionizing radiation safety issues and related standards.

Ron Petersen (left) receiving the Thomas A. Edison Award from former IEC Vice-President and SMB Chair Frank Kitzantides

Ron Petersen was the founder and first Chair of IEC Technical Committee (TC) 106: Methods for the assessment of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields associated with human exposure, a committee he chaired for more than 10 years.

Under his chairmanship, TC 106 published its first 10 International Standards, including IEC 62209-1, Measurement procedure for the assessment of specific absorption rate of human exposure to radio frequency fields from hand-held and body-mounted wireless communication devices – Part 1: Devices used next to the ear (Frequency range of 300 MHz to 6 GHz) in 2005 – the second edition was published in 2016 – which was the first globally accepted standardized method for measuring specific absorption rates (SAR) for radio frequency (RF) energy emitted by mobile phones and absorbed by the human body.

Ron Petersen also served on many international and US standards development committees throughout his career, notably at IEEE.

At the forefront of radio frequency (RF) safety R&D and electromagnetic field (EMF) safety since the 1970s, when he joined several IEEE committees, his experience and expertise were recognized by all who worked with him over the years. So much so that he was known to his peers as “the Czar of Electromagnetic Energy”.

Ron Petersen received a number of prestigious awards including the IEC Thomas A. Edison Award in 2010. He was an IEEE Life Fellow and a Fellow of the Laser Institute of America.

Ron Petersen will be fondly remembered by all those who had the privilege to know him. IEC conveys its deepest sympathies to his family and colleagues.

* Bell Labs is now Nokia Bell Labs. Lucent Technologies, Inc. was an American multinational telecommunications equipment company established in September 1996, through the divestiture of the former AT&T Technologies business unit of AT&T Corporation, which included Western Electric and Bell Labs. Lucent was merged with Alcatel SA of France in December 2006, forming Alcatel-Lucent, which in turn was absorbed by Nokia in January 2016.

 


 

Invaluable support for developing countries

By Claire Marchand
June 2018

Each year sees an increase not only in the number of countries participating in the IEC Affiliate Country Programme but also in the number of International Standards adopted as national ones, national electrotechnical committees (NECs) established and Affiliate Plus status granted. In the past 12 months, the Programme has seen changes in its leadership, and the Secretariat has been extremely busy supporting participating countries through workshops, seminars, webinars and training sessions, to name but a few of the activities organized to raise awareness and know-how in developing countries.

Affiliate Leader Rojas Manyame and IEC Affiliate Country Programme Executive Secretary Thomas Robertson

Changes at the helm in the Secretariat

Françoise Rauser, IEC Affiliate Country Programme Executive Secretary since November 2003, took early retirement at the end of 2017. Rauser was instrumental in shaping the Programme, bringing new countries into the fold year after year and assisting them in their development – a number of them have made the leap to IEC membership. Under her leadership, the Affiliate Plus status, the ACAS and mentoring programmes were established. In her 14+ years, Rauser has built a strong community of people sharing the same challenges and ready to tackle them, knowing that they always had a professional and benevolent ear to guide them to success.

 

Thomas Robertson, who joined the Programme in 2013, has taken over as Executive Secretary of the IEC Affiliate Country Programme and International Liaison for developing countries since January 2018. In turn, Sei-Yun Park has replaced Robertson as Affiliate Country Project Coordinator.

A new Affiliate Leader

Rosario Uría of Peru stepped down as Affiliate Leader at the end of her three-year term (2015-2017). In March 2018, when Peru became a member of the IEC, Uría, who is Director of Standardization at INACAL, the Peruvian National Quality Institute, took the role of Secretary of the IEC National Committee of Peru.

To succeed Uría, the Programme named Rojas Manyame of Namibia, also for a three-year term (2018-2020). Manyame is President of the Namibian National Electrotechnical Committee (NEC) and the First Vice-President of the African Electrotechnical Standardization Commission (AFSEC); he is also General Manager for Regulation of the Namibia Electricity Control Board (ECB).

Membership news

As mentioned above, Peru joined the IEC as full member in December 2017, followed by Côte D’Ivoire, an associate member since March 2018. (see article The IEC family is growing in e-tech issue 02/2018)

Another affiliate, Bangladesh, applied for associate membership at the beginning of June. The application is out for vote until 10 August 2018.

A new affiliate – São Tomé and Principe

After an initial contact between the IEC Africa Regional Centre (IEC-AFRC) and São Tomé and Principe’s National Service of intellectual Property and Quality (SENAPIQ) in January 2017, the country received an invitation to become part of the IEC Affiliate Country Programme. In December the Ministry of Finance, Commerce and Blue Economy expressed their interest in IEC activities and their intention to become part of the Programme. In March 2018, the IEC was informed of the establishment of a NEC and the Pledge was signed within a couple of days. The NEC structure was officially confirmed in June 2018.

The IEC family now has 171 countries – 85 members and 86 affiliates (86 members and 85 affiliates when Bangladesh application is approved).

Regional collaboration

IEC and ECOWAS

In February 2018, the IEC Affiliate Country Programme and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) signed a collaboration pledge. The ECOWAS Technical Management Committee and the IEC Africa Regional Centre (IEC-AFRC) will work together to promote the participation of ECOWAS members in IEC activities.

IEC and SADCSTAN

In March 2018, the IEC Affiliate Country Programme and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Cooperation in Standardization (SADCSTAN) signed a collaboration pledge. SADCSTAN and IEC-AFRC will work together to promote participation of SADC member states in CA events in the region, organized jointly by the IEC and AFSEC. They will also collaborate to encourage SADC states that are IEC affiliates to take an active part in the Programme.

IEC and CROSQ

In May 2018, the IEC and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU). Under the terms of this MoU, IEC and CROSQ agree to exchange information on standardization and promote communication; encourage the use of IEC International Standards as CARICOM regional standards (CRS) once at least three quarters of the membership of CROSQ have adopted them as national standards; facilitate the use of IEC CA Systems through the Affiliate Conformity Assessment Status (ACAS); have cross representation in annual meetings and workshops; and enhance participation in the IEC Affiliate Country Programme.

ACAS

The Affiliate Conformity Assessment Status (ACAS) was launched in 2013 to raise awareness and provide a better understanding of the specific requirements linked to conformity assessment (CA) activities. The objective is to train Affiliate Countries to use IEC International Standards and benefit from its CA Systems through the recognition of IEC CA certificates at the national level.

As part of ACAS, e-learning modules help further affiliates’ understanding of and involvement in IEC CA activities. All four IEC CA Systems – IECEE, IECEx, IECQ and IECRE – now have e-learning modules available free of charge on the IEC website. The modules are intended to train developing countries on the IEC CA Systems, including how they operate, and how developing countries can get involved. The modules are split into three levels of knowledge, with short tests available between levels. IEC intends for developing countries to use this resource, in conjunction with regional ACAS events, to familiarize themselves with IEC CA procedures.

Any affiliate country that has met the following criteria is entitled to request ACAS:

  • Officially declared the national adoption of at least one IEC International Standard used within the scope of one or more of the IEC CA Systems
  • Nominated at least one individual to use the Level 0 and Level 1 ACAS learning modules

Results since the launch of ACAS

In June 2018, 29 countries had requested the ACAS status, 15 of those since July 2017: Bhutan, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Gambia, Guinea, Mauritius, Saint Lucia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Suriname, Togo and Uganda.

20 countries have signed the ACAS Declaration, thus committing to accept IEC CA certificates, 14 of those since last year’s report: Azerbaijan, Bolivia, Cambodia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ghana, Guinea, Mauritius, Saint Lucia, Sudan, Suriname, Togo, Uganda and Uruguay.

ACAS capacity building events

IEC ACAS-COPANT-PTB regional seminar

The IEC, in collaboration with COPANT, the Pan American Standards Commission, PTB, the German National Metrology Institute and INACAL, held an IEC ACAS regional seminar in Lima, Peru, on 14-15 November 2017.

IEC representatives gave an update on IEC activities and the Affiliate Country Programme. Delegates shared their national experiences throughout their participation in IEC as members or affiliates. Topics included the establishment of a National Electrotechnical Committee (NEC), how to structure a mirror technical committee, how to comment on working documents and participation in the IEC Mentoring Programme. The seminar also focused on the IEC CA Systems and ACAS. Representatives of the CA Systems shared information on IECEE certificates, on the IECEx application for mining activities, while other delegates shared on their experience of the application of IEC CA at the national level.

Twenty-four participants (regulators and national standards body members from the region) from 12 countries as well as representatives from the CARICOM Regional Organisation for Standards and Quality (CROSQ) attended the seminar.

IEC ACAS-AFSEC Conformity Assessment Workshop

The IEC, in collaboration with AFSEC, held an IEC ACAS regional workshop, back-to-back with an AFSEC Conformity Assessment Committee (CAC) meeting. The workshop was organized as part of capacity building on conformity assessment for the African region. Topics covered included: IECEE and its CB Scheme, the main performance and safety aspects of electrical household appliances, and the efficiency of electric motors.

The interest for many participants relied on how they could use the IECEE System for the purpose of controlling the influx of sub-standard electrical goods into their national markets. Even without the infrastructure to be issuing CA certificates at the national level, it is still possible to benefit from the IECEE certificates by recognizing and referring to them.

Twenty participants from 15 countries including IEC members, IEC affiliates, and AFSEC members attended the workshop.

Affiliate mentoring programme

The IEC affiliate country and its respective mentor commit for a period of two years to reinforce the NEC through several activities, including identifying and reaching out to relevant stakeholders, national adoptions and implementation of IEC International Standards, establishing mirror technical committees and participating in IEC work.

So far, 14 affiliates have taken advantage of these partnerships with IEC members: Afghanistan – Malaysia; Bhutan – Sweden; Côte D’Ivoire – France; DR Congo – France; Ecuador – Mexico; Ethiopia – Germany; Gambia – Netherlands; Mongolia – Germany; Namibia – United Kingdom; Peru – Mexico; Rwanda – Austria; Senegal – France; Uruguay – Norway; Zambia – Austria.

Mentoring meetings in Vladivostok…

During the General Meeting in Vladivostok, a number of bilateral meetings took place between mentors and mentees: Bhutan – Sweden, Côte d’Ivoire – France, DR Congo – France, Ecuador – Mexico, Mongolia – Germany met face to face and were able to review progress made so far and establish action plans.

…and in Paris

In the context of the mentoring partnership between Senegal and France, experts from the NEC of Senegal (CEN-Sn) were invited by the French National Committee of the IEC to attend national technical meetings in France. The CEN-Sn has as main objectives to provide Senegal with international electrotechnical standards adapted to national specificities and to enforce them for the sake of developing quality infrastructure and the supply of competitive products and services. The CEN-Sn delegation had the opportunity to exchange and benefit from the expertise of AFNOR and the French NC, by participating in certain technical meetings, presentations, and visits to the Federation of Electrical, Electronic and Communication Industries (FIEEC), to the Electricity Transmission Network (RTE) and to the National Laboratory of Metrology and Tests (LNE).

WTO TBT Committees

The IEC attended the World Trade Organization (WTO) Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) Committee meetings in November 2017, March and June 2018. The Commission presented its report highlighting activities of the IEC, its members, affiliates and regional centres geared to increasing the participation of developing and industrializing countries in IEC international standardization and conformity assessment activities.

National adoptions

Since the launch of the Programme in 2001, more than 7 350 IEC International Standards have been adopted as national ones in 53 affiliate countries, seven of which have become IEC members.

At the end of July 2018, 58 countries had established their NEC with representatives of the public and private sectors, and 32 had become Affiliate Plus.

To qualify and upgrade to Affiliate Plus, countries have to fulfil two criteria:

  • Adoption of at least 50 IEC International Standards as national ones or for reference in national regulations
  • Establishment of a NEC with representatives from both public and private sectors

Find out more information on the Affiliate Country Programme


 

IEC presence on five continents

By Claire Marchand
June 2018

Since the beginning of the 2000s, IEC Central office in Geneva, Switzerland, has decentralized some of its activities, establishing regional offices first in North America, then in Asia-Pacific, Latin America and lastly in Africa.

Global reach

All IEC regional centres are focal points for IEC standardization and conformity assessment (CA) activities in their respective part of the world. They have greatly contributed to raising awareness on and promoting the Commission through country visits, participation in international, regional and national events, networking and establishing an ever growing number of invaluable contacts.

It is worth noting that the IEC has also been present in Australia for more than 20 years. The secretariats of two IEC Conformity Assessment Systems – IECEx, the IEC System for Certification for Standards Relating to Equipment for Use in Explosive Atmospheres, and IECQ, the IEC Quality Assessment System for Electronic Components – are based in Sydney (see articles on IECEx and IECQ in the Conformity Assessment section of this issue).

IEC-AFRC

In its nearly three years of existence, the IEC Africa Regional Centre (IEC-AFRC) in Nairobi, Kenya, has covered a lot of ground, both literally and figuratively.

Since its inauguration in November 2015, its two Directors, Evah Oduor and François Ahoti have travelled extensively throughout the African continent, paying visits to IEC members and affiliates to make valuable contacts and assess the need for assistance to enhance their participation in IEC work. Everywhere they meet with IEC national committees or national electrotechnical committees and key stakeholders, including regulators, government agencies, utilities, academia and consumers and emphasize the benefits they could derive from their active participation in IEC Standards development and CA work.

IEC-AFRC works closely with the African Electrotechnical Standardization Commission (AFSEC) and has also established relationships with a number of regional organizations such as the African Energy Commission (AFREC), the African Organization for Standardization (ARSO), the East African Community (EAC) the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and its Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE), the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA).

The IEC-AFRC Directors: Evah Oduor and François Ahoti.

IEC-APRC

Since 2002, the Asia-Pacific Regional Centre (IEC-APRC) has played a major role in raising awareness of the IEC, increasing the use of International Standards and CA Systems and maximizing participation of all countries in the region in the Commission’s work. It has established communication and networks with key players from industry, businesses and governments.

IEC-APRC participates actively at meetings and events of key regional inter-governmental committees like the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Consultative Committee on Standards and Quality, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Subcommittee on Standards and Conformance, as well as the meetings of their respective regulatory committees on electrical and electronic equipment. The key objective of these fora is to support free trade in the region through the use of International Standards and CA procedures.

In South Asia, IEC-APRC works closely with the South Asian Regional Standards Organization (SARSO) which has recently started efforts to adopt IEC International Standards as SAARC regional standards. SAARC, the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation, is the regional intergovernmental organization and geopolitical union of nations in South Asia.

In May 2018, the IEC Immediate Past President Junji Nomura, the IEC General Secretary and CEO Frans Vreeswijk and the IEC-APRC Regional Director Dennis Chew provided updates and had good discussions at the annual general meeting of the Pacific Area Standards Congress (PASC) which encourages its members to participate actively in IEC.

Support to National Committees

IEC-APRC works closely with national committees in the Asia-Pacific region to promote awareness of the IEC to potential stakeholders and advocate the use of IEC International Standards and CA Systems. As for Young Professionals (YPs), IEC-APRC, in collaboration with the IEC Central Office, participated in YP Programmes in China, India and New Zealand.

At the Philippines World Trade Organization (WTO) Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) national workshop in September 2017, IEC-APRC worked closely with the NC to encourage adoption and use of IEC International Standards. The workshop attracted about 110 policy makers and regulators.

IEC-APRC was also given the opportunity to share at the Indonesia Quality Week seminar on Smart Cities in Makassar in November 2017, which attracted about 700 participants.

On the technical side, IEC-APRC supports 52 technical committees and subcommittees (TC/SCs) and this number will increase to more than 70 TC/SCs by the third quarter of 2018. In addition, the Centre holds the secretariat of the Asia-Pacific Cooperation Forum, the Advisory Committee on electricity transmission and distribution (ACTAD) and the Advisory Committee on energy efficiency (ACEE). Located in a research and development hub in Singapore, IEC-APRC offers meeting facilities for IEC activities.

The IEC-APRC team: Dennis Chew (Regional Director), Suzanne Yap, Damien Lee and Anson Chiah (Technical Officers), Teo Poh Luan, Amelyn Ching and Pang Chia Li (Assistants).

IEC-LARC

Established in 2007 in São Paulo, Brazil, the Latin America Regional Center (IEC-LARC) is responsible for all promotional activities in the Latin American and Caribbean region. Its Regional Director is Amaury Santos.

IEC-LARC was set up to actively encourage the use of IEC International Standards and CA Systems and to enhance participation of countries in the Latin America region. Since its inception, the Centre has seen new countries join the list of IEC members. IEC-LARC also works closely with the Latin American countries that participate in the IEC Affiliate Country Programme, notably countries of the Andean Community and Central America.

Since 2017, the Centre has observed a growing interest in IEC international standardization and participation in other IEC-related activities, culminating with Peru – an Affiliate since 2002 – accepted as a full IEC member in December. IEC-LARC has also seen a surge in the number of enquiries about IEC CA Systems, linked to concerns about the quality of locally-manufactured or imported products.

IEC LARC has continued its work with the Pan-American Standards Commission (COPANT) and other sub-regional bodies, such as the Council for Harmonization of Electrotechnical Standards of the Nations in the Americas (CANENA) and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) with the aim of bringing knowledge about access to International Standards and IEC CA Systems in order to achieve almost the integrity of the countries of the region.

Important recognition agreements were established with FINCA, the Forum of the IEC National Committees of the Americas, and also with CROSQ, the CARICOM Regional Organization on Standards and Quality, to improve the participation of the countries from the region in the IEC activities as well to facilitate the use of IEC International Standards and CA Systems.

IEC-LARC attends, coordinates, and organizes events that match the needs of the region. They range from training seminars on the use of IEC IT tools to workshops on specific technical areas.

The IEC-LARC team: Amaury Santos (Regional Director) and Iris Szterenlicht (Assistant).

IEC-ReCNA

Located in Worcester, Massachusetts, US, the IEC Regional Centre for North America (IEC-ReCNA), has been operational since 2001. It provides support for 45 IEC TC/SCs including CISPR, particularly those with secretariats located in North America, and holds the secretariat of one of the IEC systems committees, SyC Smart energy.

IEC-ReCNA offers training sessions on its premises for TC/SC officers and hosts technical meetings. In the past 12 months, it provided training for the chair of IEC TC 78: Live working, and hosted SyC Smart energy working group meetings.

The secretariats of several IEC bodies are also with IEC-ReCNA:

  • Market Strategy Board (MSB)
  • Standardization Evaluation Group (SEG) 7: Smart manufacturing
  • Advisory Committee on electromagnetic compatibility (ACEC)
  • IEC Directives Maintenance Team (DMT)
  • ISO/IEC Joint DMT (JDMT)
  • Standardization Management Board (SMB) ad hoc Group 81: Electric vehicles and infrastructure landscaping

As Secretary of the MSB, Peter Lanctot coordinates the publication of IEC White Papers.

The IEC-ReCNA team: Tim Rotti (Regional Director), Peter Lanctot (MSB Secretary), Andrew Redgate (Technical Officer), Marlene Maillet and Holly Ducharme (Assistants).

 


 

April-May nominations and extensions

By Claire Marchand
June 2018

Over the past few months, the Standardization Management Board (SMB) nominated several new Chairs for different IEC technical committees (TCs).The SMB has approved the extension of the term of office of:

Richard Barham

A graduate from the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, Southampton University, UK, Richard Barham joined the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in 1986 where he continued his academic pursuits, gaining a PhD (again from Southampton University) in 1995. In 2016 he left the NPL to start Acoustic Sensor Networks, a new private business set up to exploit his knowledge and technical expertise developed during his 30-year career at NPL.

Barham’s research interests lie in electroacoustics and measurement science for all airborne sound applications. Working initially with measurement microphones, his interests soon extended to ear simulators and the measurement of human hearing. Some of his innovations include the development of methods for measuring acoustic impedance, now incorporated in IEC 60318-1, and for pioneering the transient response which is set to change the way traceability for objective audiometry techniques is established. His latest research in this field is on new specifications for ear simulators designed for children, where he is working within a consortium of European measurement institutes and most recently was instrumental in obtaining significant new research funding to continue this important work, under the project known as Embodied Audition for RobotS (EARS).

Barham’s predominant research interest is currently the development of new measurement systems exploiting acoustic micro-sensors based on MEMS technology, for which Acoustic Sensor Networks has been set up. However, he is maintaining an active role in acoustical metrology, standardization and training.

As a long-standing expert in acoustics and electroacoustics, Barham represents the UK on IEC technical committees. He is now Chair of IEC TC 29: Electroacoustics. He also convenes TC 29/Working Group (WG) 5 on measurement microphones, and makes significant contributions (through leading projects and developing strategic goals) to WG 10 on audiometric equipment and WG 21 on head and ear simulators.

Barham is a regular contributor to Institute of Acoustics (IOA) activities.

He has been voted chair of IEC TC 29 for the period of 2018-04-01 to 2024-03-31.

Extensions

The SMB has approved the extension of the term of office of:

  • Christian Eric Bruzek, chair of IEC TC 90: Superconductivity, for the period of 2018-04-01 to 2021-03-31.
  • Alan Hodgson, Chair of IEC TC 119: Printed electronics, for the period of 2018-04-01 to 2021-03-31.
  • Paul Holdstock, Chair of IEC TC 101: Electrostatics, for the period of 2018-05-01 to 2021-05-01.

 

Obituary – Hans Gissel

By Claire Marchand
April 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is with great sadness that we learned of the passing of IEC Past President Dr Hans Gissel, 86, on 6 March 2018.

Historic moment: the development of the first IEC Masterplan with IEC President Richard Brett, Vice-President Ryo Togei, President-Elect Hans Gissel, General Secretary Anthony Raeburn and Treasurer Mathias Fünfschilling (Photo taken in Lötschental, Valais, Switzerland, 1992)

Dr Gissel was IEC President from 1993 to 1995, serving as President-Elect in 1992 and as Immediate Past President in 1996-1997. He was also Vice-President of the German National Committee of the IEC and a consultant to the Steering Committee of DKE, the German Commission for Electrical, Electronic and Information Technologies of DIN and VDE.
A career in industry and research
Born in Rostock on 12 July 1931, Gissel studied electrotechnics at the Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule in Aachen (RWTH Aachen), the largest technical university in Germany, where he obtained his PhD (Dr.-Ing.) in 1960. On completion of his studies, he joined AEG, the German conglomerate – AEG ceased to exist in 1996 but Electrolux gained the right to use the brand name on some of its products – where he spent about forty years and occupied managerial positions until 1993. Finally, he became a member of the AEG board with responsibilities for communications and defense engineering as well as research. Additionally, in 1985 Gissel was a constituent member of the advisory group on information technology of the Federal Ministry of Research (today’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research).
Gissel left his mark on the IEC
In his three years as President of the IEC, Gissel was instrumental in shaping the future of the Commission.

Thanks to his professional career, Gissel perceived the major significance and influence of the semiconductor technology for all future IEC work. Early on, he referred to the “emerging and merging technologies”, as the big challenge of the second half of the 20th century.

IEC Masterplan

Under Gissel’s leadership, a first Masterplan was developed in the Lötschental, in the heart of the Swiss Alps, resulting in the streamlining of IEC structure and its National Committees (NCs) worldwide. It also led to a close examination of the numerous technical committees (TCs), with the consequence that some were disbanded and new ones established. Simultaneously, the President’s Advisory Committee on Future Technologies (PACT), set up by Gissel, worked as a think tank charged with the early identification of technology trends.

PACT

The role of PACT, as described in the IEC Bulletin (e-tech’s predecessor) of November/December 1994, was “to help the IEC fulfil industry’s future demand for standards in the areas of new and merging technologies, and of systems with major electrical/electronic content”. Members of the PACT think tank were presidents, vice-presidents and directors from major companies such as ABB, Alcatel Alsthom, Nokia, Philips, Rockwell, Siemens, Toshiba and leading organizations such as the China State Bureau of Technical Supervision, the Italian National Broadcasting Enterprise and the UK Institution of Electrical Engineers. In a way, PACT was the ancestor of the IEC Market Strategy Board (MSB).

Sector Boards

In an effort to better tailor standardization efforts to market needs, under Gissel’s presidency, IEC made the decision to establish Sector Boards (SBs) to cover specific market segments and with representation not only from technical and national committees but also directly from industry to ensure relevance of the Standards produced by IEC.

Ultimately, four – now defunct – SBs were active for a number of years:

  • SB 1: Electricity Transmission and Distribution
  • SB 2: Healthcare systems
  • SB 3: Industrial Automation Systems
  • SB 4: Infrastructure and Telecommunications Networks

Cooperation with CENELEC…

Gissel further developed the relationship with CENELEC, made official in 1991 under his predecessor Richard Brett with the signing of the Lugano Agreement. Gissel’s work led to the signing of the Dresden Agreement between IEC and CENELEC in 1996 (superseded by the Frankfurt Agreement of 2016) that ensure maximum harmonization and systems cooperation with IEC Standards underpinning European standards.

…ISO and ITU

With great foresight, Gissel undertook negotiations with ISO and ITU, the two sister organizations based in Geneva, with the objective of allocating competences and grouping technical and scientific resources and potentials. Interoperability was the absolute challenge, the key to the so-called merging technologies.

Lord Kelvin Award

It is also worth noting that it was also under the leadership of Hans Gissel that IEC created the IEC Lord Kelvin Award, first bestowed in 1995 on three experts for exceptional contributions to IEC work.

Praise from his successor

In his speech during Council in 1997, Bernard H. Falk, who succeeded Gissel as IEC President, paid tribute to the outstanding contribution and achievements of his predecessor:

“When I joined the IEC as President-Elect, a few years ago, I was, and I continue to be overwhelmed by Dr Gissel’s leadership abilities, and I must say it was a formidable task for me to follow the model of such an exemplary President. I learned immediately, during my first year as President-Elect, that I would take charge of the famous (and infamous) President elect task force and over the past two years, in his capacity as Immediate Past President, I can tell you, his guidance to me personally, to the Management Board, to the GPC, to the IEC in general, has been invaluable. Hans, you will be remembered by all of us for your enthusiasm and direct style. There was no hidden agenda for Dr Gissel: if he had something to say, he said it, unaffectedly. He always said exactly what he thought. People perhaps did not always like what he said, but he said it! But I am sure you will remember that what he said sprang from his total devotion to the IEC and to the high standards he set for the Commission. It is very difficult to live up to these standards! But I know I speak for all of us, Hans, when I say we will remember the standards you have set and we will all try to reach them. So I wish to thank you on behalf of all of us and on behalf of the Commission.”

The President’s tribute to Dr Hans Gissel was supported by a long standing ovation and was officially part of the meeting report.

Dr Hans Gissel leaves behind his wife Ingeborg, his daughter Anne and his sons Ralf and Norbert, their children and grandchildren.


 

The IEC family is growing

By Claire Marchand
April 2018

In the past few months, IEC has welcomed two new Members, Peru in December 2017 and Côte d’Ivoire in March 2018, both countries joining IEC after about 15 years of participation in the IEC Affiliate Country Programme. In March as well, São Tomé and Principe became the latest participant in the Programme. Taking these changes into account, the IEC family now comprises 171 countries, of which 85 are Members and 86 Affiliates.
IEC welcomes Peru
Basic facts

Situated in Western South America on the South Pacific Ocean coast, Peru shares borders with Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Ecuador. It has a population of 31 million (July 2017 est.) and its capital is Lima. According to the World Bank Group, the GDP of the country in 2016 was USD 192 billion.

Peru’s topography, which ranges from the peaks of the Andes to the plains of the Pacific coastal regions and the tropical Amazon Basin rainforest and river, has a major impact on its economy. The Andes and the coastal areas are extremely rich in a variety of mineral resources, while the coast harbours many fisheries. The country is the world’s second largest producer of silver and copper.

Total electricity production amounts to 46,31 billion kWh while electricity consumption reaches approximately 41 billion kWh. The energy generated comes from fossil fuels for 62,6%, hydroelectric plants for 33,9% and other renewable sources for 4,3% (2015 est.).

Peru and the IEC

Peru joined the IEC Affiliate Country Programme in 2002 and, having adopted 50 or more IEC International Standards as national ones, as well as having set up a National Electrotechnical Committee (NEC), reached the Affiliate Plus status in 2010. In 2014, Rosario Uría, Director of the Standardization Department at INACAL, the Peruvian National Quality Institute, became Affiliate Leader, representing all Affiliate countries and liaising with IEC governing bodies. A year later, Peru took part in the Affiliate Mentoring programme, partnering with Mexico to increase the number of mirror technical committees in the country and participation in IEC work. Through ACAS, the Affiliate Conformity Assessment Status, Peru stakeholders, regulators in particular, were able to familiarize themselves with the IEC Conformity Assessment (CA) Systems and Schemes, thus learning how to verify the authenticity of IEC CA certificates.

Having gone through those stages, the natural next step was to apply for IEC membership, a formal request that was approved by Council in December 2017.

The electrotechnical interests of Peru are represented by the IEC National Committee (NC) of Peru. NC stakeholders are experts and professionals from different sectors, such as power generation (ENEL), power distribution (Luz del Sur, Distriluz Group), manufacturing, technology (including INACAL), academy, regulators and consumers.

The President of the Peruvian NC is Orlando Chavez Chacaltana, Director, Direction of Electricity Regulation at the Ministry of Energy and Mines. The Vice-President is José Ortiz Ugarte, Commercial Manager at INDECO, a national leader in the cable industry. The Secretary is Rosario Uría and the Assistant Secretary Carmela Morgan Valencia, Standardization Executive at INACAL.
IEC welcomes Côte d’Ivoire
Basic facts

Côte d’Ivoire is situated in Western Africa, on the North Atlantic Ocean coast and bordered by Burkina Faso, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia and Mali. Its population is a little over 24 million. Yamoussoukro is its legislative capital and Abidjan its administrative and commercial capital. According to the World Bank Group, in 2016, the GDP of the country was USD 36 billion.

Agriculture engages about two-thirds of the Ivoirian population. The country is the largest producer and exporter of cocoa beans as well as a major producer and exporter of coffee and palm oil. Climatic conditions and the fluctuation in international prices for these commodities may have a big impact on the economy. Outside agriculture, the country is developing its gold mining sector and is increasingly exporting electricity to neighbouring countries.

Total electricity production amounts to 8,2 billion kWh while electricity consumption reaches approximately 5,7 billion kWh. The energy generated comes from fossil fuels for 66,9% and from hydroelectric plants for 31,3 (2015 est.).

Côte d’Ivoire and the IEC

Côte d’Ivoire joined the IEC Affiliate Country Programme in 2003 and, having adopted 50 or more IEC International Standards as national ones, as well as having set up a National Electrotechnical Committee (NEC), obtained Affiliate Plus status in 2012. The NEC was established within CODINORM, the Ivoirian Standardization Organization, now known as the National Committee of Côte d’Ivoire.

The NC has taken over from the NEC as host of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Technical Harmonization Committee for Electrotechnical Standards (THC5) and, as did the NEC, will actively participate in the standardization work of the African Electrotechnical Standardization Commission (AFSEC).

The President of the NC is Serge Ahoussou, Director of Research and Planning at Société des Energies de Côte d’Ivoire (CI-Energies). The Secretary is Alain Constant Assa, Director of Standardization at CODINORM.

Stakeholders represent companies in the electricity sector, academia, telecommunications, air navigation, manufacturers and distributors of electrical equipment, ministries, government agencies, administration, professional and consumer associations.
São Tomé and Principe, a new Affiliate
Basic facts

São Tomé and Principe, which consists of two archipelagos around the main islands of São Tomé and Principe in the Gulf of Guinea, west of Gabon and just north of the Equator, joined the Affiliate Country Programme in March 2018.

The country has a population of 201 025 (July 2017 est.) and its capital is São Tomé. Total electricity production is 66 million kWh and electricity consumption 61,4 million kWh (2015 est.).

About the Affiliate Country Programme

The Affiliate Country Programme reaches out to developing countries, giving them the opportunity to get involved with IEC without becoming members. Participating countries benefit from free IEC International Standards for national adoption. IEC Central Office helps them become more aware of the benefits of using International Standards and more familiar with the work of IEC.

 


 

Registration to attend YP workshop opens in May

By Natalie Mouyal
April 2018

The ninth IEC Young Professionals workshop will be held in Busan, Republic of Korea, on 22 to 24 October in conjunction with the IEC 2018 General Meeting. This workshop is an opportunity for the next generation of leaders to learn more about IEC and its work in standardization and conformity assessment.

The IEC Young Professionals (YP) Programme serves as a catalyst for the next generation of experts and leaders to become involved in IEC work. Developed for IEC and its National Committees to reach out to upcoming expert engineers, technicians and managers, the YP Programme helps to promote IEC standardization and conformity assessment activities. Young Professionals also bring a diversity of new voices to the organization. Since its launch in 2010, the Young Professionals Programme has welcomed a total of 468 participants from 50 countries.

IEC YP workshop

Each year, a new group of YPs is formally introduced to IEC at the annual Young Professionals workshop. Participants can network with the 3 000 IEC leaders and experts in standardization and conformity assessment attending the IEC General Meeting. The eighth edition of the YP workshop took place in Vladivostok, Russia in October 2017 and brought together 67 Young Professionals from 35 countries.

The YP workshop is an opportunity for Young Professionals to experience IEC in action. They can observe a meeting of the Standardization Management Board (SMB), the Conformity Assessment Board (CAB) or a technical meeting of their choice. Numerous breakout sessions provide participants with the opportunity to share their thoughts and, in one interactive session, to simulate a technical meeting.

A breakfast meeting is also held to foster the network between the Young Professionals and their National Committee Officers. Because National Committees serve as the gateway for Young Professionals to evolve in their participation in IEC work, they are an essential element in the continued development and involvement of young experts and leaders.

Ongoing support

Once the YP workshop is completed, collaboration with the Young Professionals continues. Individual follow-up with all participants and their National Committees encourages further involvement at either the national or international level. Young Professionals are also invited to share their thoughts about future tools and services which will enable an enhanced and active participation in IEC work in the future.

Each year, the IEC Young Professionals Programme encourages the participants to join specific projects which contribute to their increased IEC involvement and to the development of the YP Programme. In previous years, these activities have included drafting a collection of business case studies and presenting IEC at local universities.

Some YPs have been given the opportunity to take part in certain SMB and CAB groups as YP representatives. This year, a group of Young Professionals attended the IEC Future Leader’s Industry Forum in Munich to discuss cyber security in smart infrastructures, with the aim of producing a paper on the topic which will be submitted to the Market Strategy Board (MSB).

National YP activities

At the national level, a number of National Committees have begun organizing activities for their young experts.

In India, BIS launched its national equivalent IEC Young Professionals Programme in 2016 and has since organized three workshops. The most recent workshop was held in March in Bangalore. Similarly, China launched its first workshop in 2017 and is planning another one later this year. Other National Committees planning YP workshops in 2018 include Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

 

Registration to participate in this year’s IEC Young Professionals workshop will be open from mid-May until the end of July. The YP workshop will take place in Busan, Republic of Korea from 22 to 24 October alongside the IEC General Meeting. It is expected that approximately 70 participants will attend from over 35 countries.

Prior to attending the YP workshop, upcoming Young Professionals are asked to complete an online pre-workshop training course to familiarize them with IEC work. It contains information slides, videos and a questionnaire for completion.

Further information about the IEC Young Professionals workshop can be found on the YP Programme web page. Details about the selection process in each country are available from National Committees.

 


 

January 2018 nominations and extensions

By Claire Marchand
January 2018

Over the past few months, the Standardization Management Board (SMB) nominated several new Chairs for different IEC technical committees (TCs).

Jürgen Havemann

With a doctor’s degree in steam turbine mechanical engineering from Moscow Power Engineering Institute and a professional career in that field spanning more than 35 years, Dr Havemann has been lending his experience and expertise to IEC TC 5: Steam turbines, since 2010. He was a member, then the Convenor of TC 5/Working Group (WG) 11 (disbanded); in 2015 he became the Convenor of TC 5/Maintenance Team (MT) 12: Maintenance of IEC 60045-1, of which he was a member since 2012. From 2012 to 2017, he was the Secretary of TC 5/AG 15: Chairman’s Advisory Group (CAG).

Dr Havemann is currently Senior Key Expert at Siemens AG Power and Gas Division – Steam Turbines in Germany, a company he joined in 1991.

He has been voted chair of IEC TC 5 for the period of 2018-01-01 to 2023-12-31.

Philip Wennblom

Since 1 January 2018, Philip Wennblom is the new Chair of the ISO and IEC Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC JTC 1: Information technology.

Wennblom, who holds a Bachelor of Science (BS) in Electrical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, is Senior Director of Standards Policy for Intel Corporation, a company he joined in 1984 as design engineer. As part of the Government and Policy Group, his team sets Intel standards policy positions and leads Intel representation in strategic standards-setting organizations worldwide.

Wennblom has been a member of the InterNational Committee for Information Technology Standards (INCITS) since 2002 and has served as Chairman of its Executive Board since 2013. He served as chair of the INCITS Finance Board Committee from 2009 until 2013; he received the INCITS Chairman’s award in 2010.

Wennblom has served on US delegations to the ISO/IEC JTC 1 Plenary since 2005 and has been head of delegation since 2013. At ISO/IEC JTC 1, he has participated in the Special Working Group (SWG) on Planning, and he convened the SWG on Management. He has participated in the ISO/IEC JTC 1 Advisory Group since it was formed in 2016.

Philip Wennblom has been voted Chair of ISO/IEC JTC 1 for the period 2018-01-01 to 2020-12-31.

Extension

The SMB has approved the extension of the term of office of Richard Schomberg, chair of IEC Project Committee (PC) 118: Smart grid user interface, for the period of 2018-01-01 to 2020-12-31.

 


 

A life devoted to Standards

By Catherine Bischofberger
January 2018

Jan Ollner was Executive Secretary of the Swedish National Committee (NC) from 1948 until 1956. This was a time of rapid change for the IEC, with Central Office moving from London to Geneva and a number of new Technical Committees established in various fields, including IEC TC 34: Lamps and related equipment or IEC TC 35: Primary cells and batteries. The 97-year-old talks to us about the merits of standardization, his years as Swedish NC Executive Secretary and his work for ASEA (now ABB).

As Executive Secretary of SEK, the Swedish National Committee, you met Charles Le Maistre, the first IEC Secretary General, in the years after the war. How did that come about?

In 1948, I was the General Secretary of the IEC General Meeting (GM) which took place in Stockholm. That’s where I met Charles Le Maistre, together with Assistant Secretary General Louis Ruppert, who succeeded him in 1953. To the young fellow that I was then Charles Le Maistre was a very impressive man– at that point he had been IEC Secretary General for more than 40 years! He had held the IEC fort in London during the war. Thanks to him, the IEC was able to emerge from the Second World War relatively unscathed and pick up where it left off, so to speak.

 

What were the changes you witnessed during your time as Swedish NC Secretary?

It was a very exciting time to be around. New Technical Committees (TCs) were created on a regular basis. The number of IEC delegates increased greatly. A total of 150 delegates spread across 30 TCs attended the 1948 General Meeting. As it so happens, I was involved in organizing the 1958 General Meeting which also took place in Stockholm, even though I was no longer Secretary of the Swedish NC. Around 1200 delegates attended the 1958 GM. That gives you an idea of IEC growth over that period of time.

It was also an era defined by the Cold War. How did that impact the work of the IEC?

Despite the Cold War we worked with our Russian colleagues in a spirit of cooperation which I think has always been one of the hallmarks of the IEC. I have fond memories of the 1957 General Meeting which took place in Moscow when Nikita Khrushchev had just got into power. I remember that there was a reception at the Kremlin which turned out to be quite a lavish affair with lots of caviar and vodka. The Russian delegates certainly made the most of the buffet! During my time as Secretary of the Swedish NC, a GM was held in Opatija, in former Yugoslavia, which was also part of the Eastern bloc at that time.

You visited IEC Central Office during that period…

Yes, I came to Geneva to prepare for the 1958 General Meeting. In those days, Central Office was located in a nice house on Route de Malagnou, in the countryside outside Geneva. The IEC shared the office with ISO and only six people worked there. Mr Ruppert’s Secretary was Jean Marshall and funnily enough she had a namesake in ISO, Mr Roger Maréchal, who worked under ISO Secretary General Henry St. Leger. The relationship between IEC and ISO was pretty close in those days, so much so that Jean Marshall and Roger Maréchal actually got married! Both of them became very good friends of mine. I am still in touch with Jean Marshall-Maréchal who lives in Lyon.

(nb: The two organizations have indeed always been close. IEC Secretary General Charles Le Maistre was instrumental in the founding of ISO. He led the effort to establish the International Federation of the National Standardization Associations (ISA) in 1926, which was ISO’s precursor. In 1944 he became Secretary General of the United Nations Standards Coordinating Committee (UNSCC), an interim organization which led to the founding of ISO in 1946.)

You were also an expert in one of the IEC’s first TCs, IEC TC 2: Rotating machinery. Can you tell us more about your work with that TC?

Yes, I was Secretary of a now disbanded Subcommittee (SC) 2B: Mounting dimensions and output series. We were dealing with the standardization of electric motors used in machinery and factories. We had to make sure that all electric motors driving electric machinery had the same sizes and specifications. The thinking was that if all electric motors met the same Standards, then they would be easier to export and that would boost trade.

(nb: TC 2: Rotating machinery is still going strong today. It prepares International Standards regarding specifications for rotating electrical machines used in motors, with the exception of traction motors for railway equipment, and motors and generators used in electric road vehicles, industrial trucks or aeronautics and space applications. The TC developed the IEC 60034 series of International Standards which, among other things, rank electric motors according to their efficiency classes. Regulators everywhere in the world have taken on board this classification system and made it part of their policies.)

You were an engineer for ASEA at the same time?

Yes. The company was called ASEA, before becoming ABB after the merger with Swiss company BBC Brown Boveri in the 1980s. Initially I joined the company in 1946, a couple of years before my stint at SEK. The Chairman of the ASEA board in those days was Sigfrid Edström. He attended the International Electrical Congress in St. Louis in 1904, which led to the founding of the IEC in 1906. I then went back to work for ASEA in 1957. I wrote a book about my years at ASEA, called The Company and Standardization. I explain how we set up the company’s own standardization department which I managed. Its purpose was partly to simplify and facilitate the design and manufacture of ASEA products. As Senior Engineer, I eventually became Head of Technical Coordination Services. I retired in 1968 and became director of the Swedish Standards Institute (SIS). So you could say that I have always worked in and around Standards.

 


 

The IEC Future Leaders Industry Forum

By Claire Marchand
January 2018

Recognizing the need to ensure continuity in its standards development and conformity assessment activities, the IEC has, since 2010, reached out to up and coming young experts active in a variety of technological sectors through the IEC Young Professionals Programme and its annual workshop, held in conjunction with the IEC General Meeting.

A new opportunity for IEC Young Professionals

This year the Commission and its Young Professionals (YP) Programme is proposing a new initiative to give IEC YPs an opportunity to support the IEC Market Strategy Board (MSB) market and technology watch activities. The IEC Future Leaders Industry Forum will bring together IEC YPs who are experts in security in smart Infrastructures to share their insights on what challenges and opportunities lie ahead for the IEC in this area. The Forum will take place in Munich, Germany, on 26-27 March 2018 and the outcomes will be published in a technology insight paper.

The forum will be sponsored by MSB member Siemens and will be moderated by VDI/VDE Innovation + Technology GmbH (VDI/VDE-IT), a leading service provider for issues related to innovation and technology.

Before and during the Forum

Participants will be invited to discuss the following topics related to security in smart infrastructures and to make recommendations to IEC:

  • Current industry landscape
  • Top innovations that are expected to shape the industry in the coming years
  • Anticipated standardization needs
  • Anticipated conformity assessment needs

The following IEC National Committees have selected Future Leaders (from their IEC YPs) in the area of security in smart infrastructure to take part in the Forum: Australia, Canada, China, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, Singapore, Switzerland, UK and USA.

Benefits for Future Leaders and their employers

Participants will have the opportunity to network with top experts in security in smart infrastructures, learn more about IEC work in their specific field and influence future IEC standards development, conformity assessment and market strategy work through the technology insight paper’s recommendations.

Employers will help support the IEC market and technology watch activities which influence the future of IEC standardization and conformity assessment activities. They will also obtain advanced knowledge of the latest IEC developments in their field.

Both Future Leaders and their employers will gain exposure within the IEC community by appearing in the paper.

The Forum

The Forum will start in the afternoon of 26 March with an industry visit to the Siemens IT/cyber security lab, which will include a demonstration of a cyber attack on a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) controller. A networking opportunity will then be offered in the evening during a welcome reception.

The next day will be entirely dedicated to discussions on security in smart infrastructures leading to the development of the technology insight paper capturing the essence of the discussions.

A new opportunity for IEC Young Professionals

This year the Commission and its Young Professionals (YP) Programme is proposing a new initiative to give IEC YPs an opportunity to support the IEC Market Strategy Board (MSB) market and technology watch activities. The IEC Future Leaders Industry Forum will bring together IEC YPs who are experts in security in smart Infrastructures to share their insights on what challenges and opportunities lie ahead for the IEC in this area. The Forum will take place in Munich, Germany, on 26-27 March 2018 and the outcomes will be published in a technology insight paper.

The forum will be sponsored by MSB member Siemens and will be moderated by VDI/VDE Innovation + Technology GmbH (VDI/VDE-IT), a leading service provider for issues related to innovation and technology.

Before and during the Forum

Participants will be invited to discuss the following topics related to security in smart infrastructures and to make recommendations to IEC:

  • Current industry landscape
  • Top innovations that are expected to shape the industry in the coming years
  • Anticipated standardization needs
  • Anticipated conformity assessment needs

The following IEC National Committees have selected Future Leaders (from their IEC YPs) in the area of security in smart infrastructure to take part in the Forum: Australia, Canada, China, Germany, India, Italy, Korea, Singapore, Switzerland, UK and USA.

Benefits for Future Leaders and their employers

Participants will have the opportunity to network with top experts in security in smart infrastructures, learn more about IEC work in their specific field and influence future IEC standards development, conformity assessment and market strategy work through the technology insight paper’s recommendations.

Employers will help support the IEC market and technology watch activities which influence the future of IEC standardization and conformity assessment activities. They will also obtain advanced knowledge of the latest IEC developments in their field.

Both Future Leaders and their employers will gain exposure within the IEC community by appearing in the paper.

The Forum

The Forum will start in the afternoon of 26 March with an industry visit to the Siemens IT/cyber security lab, which will include a demonstration of a cyber attack on a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) controller. A networking opportunity will then be offered in the evening during a welcome reception.

The next day will be entirely dedicated to discussions on security in smart infrastructures leading to the development of the technology insight paper capturing the essence of the discussions.

 


 

IEC elects new Vice President / Chair of the Conformity Assessment Board and new Treasurer

January 2018

Jo Cops

Belgian Jo Cops took up his new role as IEC Treasurer on 1 January, 2018. As a member of the Executive Committee he is responsible for IEC finances and will facilitate the decision-making process about strategic investments and project funding. He will be responsible for IEC finances and report directly to the Council where all IEC Members are represented.

“I’m honoured to have been elected by the IEC membership and it is a real privilege to serve as Treasurer in times where standardization for present and new technologies is high on the agenda. In our fast-paced environment, focus on financials becomes essential since they reflect the operating performance of the IEC. Finance influences and is influenced by all other corporate functions. In that sense, being a Treasurer is no longer just about financial statements and bookkeeping, it also involves taking forward-looking actions supported by financial tools and techniques to give the IEC and its Members the added value they are looking for.”

Cops has a Master’s Degree in Engineering, and degrees in Business Economics, Digital Leadership and Financial Management. With a career spanning over 25 years, he began working for Sony Belgium. He then held various management positions within Sony Europe, Belgian provider of media and telecommunications services Telenet, and Alpha Technologies Europe, with responsibilities pertaining to sales, budgeting, pricing, marketing and strategic planning.

He has been involved in a number of standardization development organizations, including Secretary General of the Belgian Electrotechnical Committee (CEB-BEC) since 2013, and permanent delegate for Belgium in CENELEC, the European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization, where he is a member of the Working Group Policy and the BT Efficiency group.

Shawn Paulsen

Since 1 January 2018, Shawn Paulsen is a new IEC Vice-President and Chair of the Conformity Assessment Board (CAB). In this position, he is responsible for the conformity assessment work of the IEC.

“I consider it a great honour and an equally great responsibility to be elected IEC Vice-President and Chair of the IEC Conformity Assessment Board. With the global recognition of the IEC Conformity Assessment Systems and growing market pressure to expand into new areas and seek new conformity assessment opportunities, this is a critical time for the IEC to be ready to meet these challenges. I see many exciting opportunities ahead for IEC Conformity Assessment, building on the very successful IEC CA systems that we currently have, and facing the future together.”

Currently, Paulsen is the Manager of Conformity Assessment within the CSA Group in Canada. He previously served as the Chief Electrical Inspector in the Department of Public Safety for the New Brunswick Provincial Electrical Regulator. In this role, Paulsen was the Provincial representative on national codes, standards and conformity assessment committees.

With a career spanning over 35 years, Paulsen has significant experience in technical and policy standards work at both the national and international levels. He has been involved in the work of a number of organizations including the Canadian Standards Association, IEEE, International Association of Electrical Inspectors, ANSI, the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), and the Canadian Advisory Council on Electrical Safety. Paulsen has been a member of the IEC Conformity Assessment Board since 2012 and has served as the Canadian representative to IECEE and IECRE.

Paulsen holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and is also a licensed industrial / commercial construction electrician.

In addition to being elected as IEC Vice-President and Chair of the Conformity Assessment Board, Mr. Paulsen was recently awarded the IEC 1906 Award for his commitment to international conformity assessment through his involvement with the IECEE.


 

Introducing the 2017 Young Professional Leaders

By Claire Marchand
January 2018

The IEC Young Professionals (YP) Programme brings together upcoming expert engineers, technicians and managers from all over the world, who aspire to become more involved in the IEC and help shape the future of international standardization and conformity assessment in the field of electrotechnology. In this issue of e-tech, we introduce the three 2017 Leaders of the IEC Young Professionals Programme who were elected by their peers in Vladivostok, Russia, during the IEC General Meeting.The three 2017 YP Leaders were elected by their peers at the 81st IEC General Meeting in Vladivostok, Russia2017 YP Leaders

The YP Leaders act as ambassadors of the YP Programme and are an important connection between the Programme and its participants. As a follow-up to the YP workshop in Vladivostok the YP Leaders reached out to their group of YPs to ask them to identify one or more project(s)/working group(s) etc. of interest. The objective of this initiative was to help YPs take some concrete actions to increase their participation, wherever possible and in line with the YPs’ National Committees, in a specific and relevant IEC activity. The YP Leaders are expected to attend the next YP workshop in Busan, Rep. of Korea, where they will lead several sessions and act as a link between the 2017 and 2018 YPs.

The three 2017 YP Leaders are:

  • Annette Frederiksen, Germany
  • Juan Li, China
  • Jorge Richard Angulo, Mexico

Annette Frederiksen

Annette Frederiksen studied mechatronics at the Technical University of Dresden, Germany, where she specialized in micro mechatronics and received her Engineering Diploma (Dipl.-Ing.) in 2009. In 2012, she received her PhD (Dr.-Ing.) from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), for her research on scanning laser projection systems. During her studies, she interned for the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. In 2008, she joined Robert Bosch GmbH while completing her diploma thesis and from 2009 to 2011, she took part in the Bosch PhD programme in cooperation with KIT.

Since 2011, Frederiksen, who holds five patents, has been working in the Bosch Corporate Research and Advance Engineering department, as part of the optics and optoelectronics group. Her work topics are simulation, development and prototyping of new concepts for display and optical sensor technologies.

Frederiksen is actively involved in eye safety evaluation of complex laser products. She participates as an expert in several working groups (WGs) of IEC Technical Committee (TC) 76: Optical radiation safety and laser equipment. She is a member of WG 1:Optical radiation safety, WG 3: laser radiation measurement and WG 8: Development and maintenance of basic standards. She is also a member of DKE/GK 841, the German mirror committee of IEC TC 76. Since 2017, Frederiksen is the Secretary of CENELEC Technical Body CLC/TC 76.

Juan Li

Juan (Applejuan or Apple) Li received a Master’s degree in Computer Science Network Security from Sichuan University, China, in 2010. For the next four years she was a doctoral student in computer science – service-oriented architecture and industry management at INSA, the national institute of applied sciences in Lyon, France, where she obtained her PhD.

Upon completion of her studies, Li joined Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, where she became an industry development engineer with Business Development Manager and Framework Transformation Manager certifications.

Li has been working with several international industry standards organizations, such as TM Forum and The Open Group, on digital transformation of telecommunication operations. She has led and contributed to more than nine industry standards, including the first telecommunication industry digital maturity model (DMM), telco data monetization governance functions, digital payment ecosystem, business support system (BSS) key performance indicators (KPIs) for good customer experience, and others. She is hoping to expand her expertise in information and communications technology (ICT) related areas.

Jorge Richard Angulo

Jorge Richard Angulo has a Mechanical Engineering Master of Science degree from the Technological Institute of Celaya, Mexico, and has recently attended advanced courses on leadership and Big Data Analytics at ITAM, the Mexico City technological institute.

Since mid-2016, he has been a Programme Manager at General Electric, with experience in product R&D, engineering, productivity and technical compliance. He has worked on the business development of new innovative products, from conception to return on investment. During his career he has worked for small, medium and multinational companies in the medical, appliances and energy industries, based in Mexico, the US, Germany and Brazil. He has led several engineering teams, including a regional compliance team more recently. He is currently working on world needs with a special focus on analytics-big data and internet of things (IoT) by means of tangible, safe and energy efficient products.

Richard Angulo holds three granted patents in the appliance industry which endorse innovative products currently on the market. He is involved nationally with the mirror committee of IEC Subcommittee (SC) 23K: Electrical energy efficiency products, and with the mirror Systems Committee (SyC) on smart cities. He enjoys being a digital learner and is a passionate open water swimmer.